Posts

The making of Serenity Sunrise

Reposted over 10 times on Instagram alone, and with more than 25,000 likes combined, this Serenity Sunrise photo is my most reposted image on Instagram. Today, I thought I’d share with you the post-processing that went into making this image. While most of my images will go through a number of processes in Adobe Lightroom and/or Photoshop, you may be disappointed to know that only minor adjustments were made to this photo to make it look the way I posted it on Instagram. This post will describe to you how and why I went through processing this image.

How I Edited Serenity Sunrise

The Origin of the Name Serenity Sunrise

Before I get to the post-processing, let me tell you how the name Serenity Sunrise came about. I’m not really the one to actually name each of my images, so why did I name this Serenity Sunrise? The name actually spawned from a repost and comment made from @Umbra_ltd. They reposted my photo mentioning that the photo was captured in Rose Quartz, one of the Pantone colours of the year. This thought never even occurred to me when I took this, and for someone in the print industry as well, I should have known better!

PANTONE Colours of the Year 2016

PANTONE Colours of the Year 2016

For those who do not know, every year PANTONE chooses what it deems will be the next colour of the year. This colour is thought to trend in different industries like fashion and interior design for the upcoming year. For this year (2016), Pantone chose not one, but two colours of the year: Rose Quartz, and Serenity.

While Rose Quartz is evident at first glance, if you look close enough, you’ll see pockets of Serenity mixed in the shadow areas, particularly within the skyline. This inconspicuous addition of Serenity I thought really enhances the feel of the overall image. So in essence, this photo is a great representation of both PANTONE colours of the year: Rose Quartz and Serenity.

Rather than naming it Rose Quartz Sunrise, I thought the subtle representation of Serenity, and the name, lent itself perfectly for a sunrise photo. Hence the name, Serenity Sunrise. It also just rolls off the tongue smoothly, don’t you think?

The Before and After


If you look at the slider above, you can see the before and after image of Serenity Sunrise.

If you slide the middle slider bar all the way to the right, you’ll be able to see the original unedited image that came out of my camera. If you slide the bar all the way to the left, you can see the After image, after it was post-processed to my liking in Adobe Lightroom. There’s actually very little difference between the two apart from lightening up certain areas of the image.

The actual image I posted on Instagram was a portrait version of this, for which I’ll explain why I did that, a little later.

The Lightroom Basic Panel Adjustment

Lightroom Basic Adjustment Panel

Lightroom Basic Adjustment Panel

This is pretty much all that went into making this image shine. The adjustment that made the largest impact would be the White Balance. This will dictate the overall mood of your image. With a +10 toward Magenta in the hues, and a temperature that ‘s overall pretty cool (towards the blue), you can see how the Rose Quartz and Serenity would play into the image.

An Exposure boost of +0.3 brightens the image overall, which you can tell. The Shadows were also opened up with a +31. But I lowered the Blacks to -43 so as not to make the image too flat. Boosting the Clarity to +43 accentuated the shadow areas more by darkening the shadows and lightening the highlights. Believe it or not, boosting the Vibrance to +25 didn’t do a whole lot in terms of making this image more Rose Quartz. It merely heightened the subtle colour of Serenity within the skyline.

If you look at the Tone Curve, it’s pretty much linear with the exception at the Shadow areas. I lifted the Darks up a bit because I didn’t want the blacks to be truly black. It would have attracted too much attention otherwise.

There you have it!

As Posted on Instagram

The photo cropped to portrait orientation, and uploaded to Instagram.

The photo cropped to portrait orientation, and uploaded to Instagram.

Here’s the actual photo that was posted to Instagram. While the image itself is landscape, I post images to Instagram in portrait orientation because I feel it the image is more impactful. The portrait mode fills the screen more, allowing the photo itself to shine. However, when you post landscape images on Instagram, the width of the image is always shown in full, thereby only taking up a fraction of the screen on your mobile device, allowing for the comments below to overtake the screen. This detracts away from the beauty of the image, and I feel is one of Instagram’s weaker elements.


If you enjoyed this blog post, let me know in the comments below and I will continue on with this series on how I edit my images.

 

Product Review: Moment Case and Lenses

Moment Lenses and Case Review

Lens additions aren’t new to mobile photography. There’s plenty of choices out there from generic third party lenses to more notable ones like Olloclips. But when I came across Moment’s lenses and case Kickstarter campaign in 2015, I couldn’t help but get behind this piece of glass.

Product Review: Moment Case and LensesMoment first released their lenses in 2014, however, I only came across them from their second Kickstarter campaign, which was a companion case to their lenses. I’m never a fan of buying things that are made specifically for a device, since I’m prone to changing/upgrading my iPhone every year or two. However, I went ahead and ordered the case, along with their wide angle 18mm and telephoto 60mm lenses.

Moment 18mm and 60mm lenses with case.

Moment 18mm and 60mm lenses with case.

I received my case and lenses in December 2015, just in time for the Christmas holidays. Upon opening the packages, I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of the case and lenses. Let me start with the case, since that’s their latest campaign.

The Moment Case

The moment case comes in a few different colour combinations: black on black, wood on black, and white on black. I chose the latter for my iPhone 6s Plus, and I really like the little bit of white on top, as it adds a little contrast to the rest of the case, which is quite large.

Moment lens attached to case.

Moment lens attached to case.

The case—apart from the white top, which is plastic—has a really nice feel to it: it’s firm yet has a rubbery felt-like feel to it, thanks to the custom TPU material that they use. It provides just the right amount of friction for a secure grip, and as the folks at Moment says, it’s “not so grippy that it gets stuck in your pocket.”

Moment lenses and Moment case.

Moment lenses and Moment case.

The case is tapered, offering a thicker grip, which allows for better handling of your phone in landscape mode. This thicker area is also where the circuit board and battery resides. The battery lights the LED light that shows when there’s a connection with the Moment app, and also sends information to the app when you press the shutter button.

Moment case from bottom of iPhone.

Moment case from bottom of iPhone.

The bottom of the case is open, so you won’t have any problems with inserting anything in the earphone jack or lightning cable port. The added aluminum bar acts as a neck strap hook and is a nice touch as well, although this piece on my case is a little wobbly upon touch.

Why is this case special?

Apart from adding another level of protection for your iPhone, the case acts as an interface to the collection of Moment lenses that they offer. Their proprietary interface is embedded within the case so all you need to do is twist the lens on to the case. The interface is well built and twisting on the lens is a breeze. There’s no click to lock the lens in place like you see on a dSLR, but I feel confident that the lens won’t easily twist off.

More importantly though, the case allows for added functionality when shooting with your iPhone. By adding a shutter button to the case, you’re now able to use that button to hold focus (by half-pressing the button), while we swipe on the screen to fine-tune adjustments like exposure. It took me a bit of time to get the hang of this as I wasn’t used to half-pressing and swiping at the same time. But once you’re used to it, the feature becomes quite handy.

Lens attachment

The case recognizes when you attach a lens to the case. While initially (if I remember correctly) the idea was that it automatically knew which lens was attached. The way it is now, you have to tell the Moment app which lens you have just attached. Moment says this “unlocks advanced software features” specific to each lens. What these features are, I do not know.

Moment camera app screen capture.

Moment camera app screen capture.

Note, if you don’t have the case, Moment sells a stainless steel mounting plate that you can stick to any mobile device, allowing you to use any one of their lenses.

The lens cap and magnet

The two lens caps that came with my combo does a great job in protecting the front element of the lens. It’s not flimsy by any means, and has a protective foam layer on the inside. There’s a small magnet hidden inside the lens cap so it can conveniently attach itself to the Moment Case, which also has a magnet on the top of the grip. It’s their way of making sure that you don’t lose the lens cap when you’re using the lens.

Moment case with cap magnetically attached.

Moment case with cap magnetically attached.

The magnet isn’t super strong though, so just be careful when you’ve got it attached. Your hand will cover the lens cap when holding the phone and if you’re not careful, you can easily knock the lens cap right off the magnetic spot with a quick swipe.

The Lenses

The Moment currently has three lenses in their collection: 18mm, 60mm, and a macro lens.

Moment 60mm and 18mm lenses.

Moment 60mm telephoto and 18mm wide lenses.

My Kickstarter package came with the 18mm and 60mm. Similar to the Moment case, as soon as I handled these lenses, I was pleasantly surprised at the quality. Gone are the days of cheap, plastic lenses with clip-on attachments. These are heavy-duty lenses made with quality glass, multi-element designs, and aerospace-quality stainless steel. When you pick one up, you’ll notice this quality instantly. It’s solidly built, and looks terrific.

Moment lenses in carrying sacs and lens covers.

Moment lenses in carrying sacs and lens covers.

18mm wide

As a landscape photographer, I immediately drew my attention to the 18mm wide angle lens. I love the added focal length this gives me. The large landscape coverage gives me that same feeling as when I shoot with my 14mm on my Nikon D800. You can see how much more coverage the lens gives you, below. The iPhone camera without any attachment has a focal length of approx. 29/30mm (35mm equivalent). The 18mm is much wider as you can see.

Moment 18mm lens attached to Moment case.

Moment 18mm lens attached to Moment case.

I’ve noticed a slight vignetting with this lens (see sample photos below). It’s nothing I can’t live with though. On the Moment lens website though, it says “clear edge to edge.” From my test samples below, I’m not so sure I can agree with this. If you look at the sample photos, you’ll see the corners and edges are a little blurry, which is a shame. I could live with the vignetting, but I would have loved to have edge to edge sharpness, as mentioned on their site.

60mm telephoto

The telephoto lens does a terrific job at getting you that much closer to the subject. Forget the digital zooms on your iPhone as that just yields in poor quality images as a product of digital extrapolation. Having an optical telephoto lens means you’ll come out with top quality images that you’ll be surprised came out of a mobile device.

Moment 60mm lens attached to Moment case.

Moment 60mm lens attached to Moment case.

Looking at the images below, you’ll notice how much closer the subject is (two times closer). Of course, a steady hand will always help more with any telephoto lens, so be sure to hold it steady, or use a tripod like I always do.

Do I Really Need These?

If you love taking photos with your iPhone or mobile device, the Moment case and lenses won’t disappoint. Apart from the slight vignetting and distortion that I saw with my 18mm lens, I have to say it’s the best lens addition to my iPhone that I’ve ever seen thus far.

These are by no means a necessity for any iPhone user, but more so an added benefit to being able to take extra wide and telephoto photos. The interaction with their app adds a nice touch and really enhances the picture-taking experience on a mobile device, which ultimately has given me even more of an excuse to go out and start shooting again.

Moment 18mm attached to Moment iPhone 6/6s Plus case.

Moment 18mm attached to Moment iPhone 6/6s Plus case.

Sample Photos

To better compare the results, here are a couple sample landscapes that I took with each of the lenses, along with the shot taken with the regular iPhone 6s Plus camera for comparison. These images have been resized and saved for web; apart from that, no editing has been done.

Regular iPhone 6s Plus shot.

Regular iPhone 6s Plus shot.

Taken with the Moment 18mm lens.

Taken with the Moment 18mm lens.

If you look at the top left corner, you’ll notice that the finer tree branches are not as clear as the rest of the branches surrounding them. And if you compare these branches to those in the iPhone 6s Plus photo, you can really see that the quality has dropped a little with the lens.

Taken with the Moment 60mm lens.

Taken with the Moment 60mm lens.

Now, look at the top left corner of this photo. It’s slightly blurred along with the rest of that left side. In fact, all corners are slightly blurry if you look closely.

Test Photo 2

Regular iPhone 6s Plus Landscape.

Regular iPhone 6s Plus Landscape.

Taken with the Moment 18mm lens.

Taken with the Moment 18mm lens.

Looking at the top corners (left and right), you’ll see there is slight vignetting. It’s harder to see on the bottom corners, but it’s there as well.

Taken with the Moment 60mm lens.

Taken with the Moment 60mm lens.

The top right corner is slightly darker here as well. And again, you can notice that the entire left side of the photo is slightly blurred.

Bonus

And if you’re curious, here are a couple photos I took with my Nikon D800, where I changed the focal length until I matched the composition that I took with the Moment 18mm and 60mm lenses. The first photo turned out to be 19mm, which is pretty close. The second photo turned out to be 58mm, which is also pretty close. This test doesn’t really do much except tell me that I did a pretty good job matching the composition between the two cameras.

Nikon D800 at 19mm.

Nikon D800 at 19mm.

Nikon D800 at 58mm.

Nikon D800 at 58mm.

If you’ve taken great photos with Moment lenses, feel free to comment below and let me know!


For more information on the Moment case and lenses, head over to their website at http://www.momentlens.co.

2015 Year in Review – iPhone Photography

While it was difficult to pick my 2015 Year in Review for my Nikon photos, believe it or not it’s even more difficult to do the same for my iPhone Photography.

2015 Year in Review: iPhone Photography

My iPhone is always with me and that’s one reason why it’s easier to take priceless moments when they arise. Furthermore, there’s really no setting up when it comes to taking pictures with your iPhone: as soon as I open the camera app, I’m ready to take a photo. That being said, there’s a certain amount of foresight involved with iPhone Photography as well.

My favourite iPhone photography for 2015 are below, and indicates a wide variety of photo genre and editing styles, as experimentation is always in order when it comes to iPhone photo taking and editing.

Fiery sunrise over Lake Ontario.

Fiery sunrise over Lake Ontario.

This photo is similar to the one I took with my Nikon, but the editing was a little different, producing another moody photo to one of the most vibrant sunrises I’ve ever seen in Toronto.

Long exposure sunrise using Slow Shutter Cam app.

Long exposure sunrise using Slow Shutter Cam app.

I’ve always been a fan of long exposure photography, and doing these on an iPhone is super-easy with the Slow Shutter Cam app. I always make it a point to carry my mini-tripod with me so that I can produce long-exposures in moments where I least expect to. This one was taken during the sunrise hours where the reflection of the light on the serene lake made the moment extra special.

Beached in Hamilton

Beached in Hamilton

This photo above was taken on the shorelines of Hamilton where I decided to come on a whim. With the cold temps, strong wind, and open area, I hoped to capture the essence of the moment. The purple colour was added from a filter, but represented the subtle colours that were present in the early evening hours.

Ice climbing in Hamilton.

Ice climbing in Hamilton.

Here’s a moment where I lucked out by coming to the waterfalls when a group of ice climbers were having their weekend lesson. I wasn’t the only photographer there, so I managed to get some tips from a veteran ice climb photographer. The race to the top yielded in this perfectly timed shot where the climbers themselves formed a mountain!

Swirling Jet Skiers at Scarborough Bluffs

Swirling Jet Skiers at Scarborough Bluffs

Here’s where I was fortunate enough to be at the Scarborough Bluffs, where a group of jet-skiers came zooming into the scene as they held a meetup on the beach. I captured them having fun in the water as they twirled around as if they knew I was taking their photos.

Quintessentially Rocky Mountains.

Quintessentially Rocky Mountains.

My trip to Alberta also produced some of my favourite images from my iPhone. This one, just off the Bow Valley Highway to me, seems like the perfect Rocky Mountain scene, which had some great wispy clouds to add even more interest to the landscape. The railroad cutting through the trees is a great guide to lead the eyes from one side of the image to the other.

On the lookout at Mt. Norquay.

On the lookout at Mt. Norquay.

I normally don’t have people in my landscapes, but this moment was too good to pass up. As my wife stood there admiring the view from the Mt. Norquay lookout, I stepped back and quickly took this with my iPhone as I loved her stance, her hat, and the background. It just all fit perfectly.

Winter shoreline in black and white.

Winter shoreline in black and white.

While I normally edit in colour, on occasion when I see the opportunity to make a great monochromatic image, I go for it. This image was just the case where the long exposure of the lake played well with the ice- and snow-covered shoreline. This shot would have been difficult on a dSLR if I didn’t have a ND filter.

The sun rising above Lake Ontario.

The sun rising above Lake Ontario.

This may be one of my favourite iPhone sunrise photos as the colours were just so brilliant. The fog hovering over Lake Ontario makes this extra moody and I’m glad my iPhone was able to capture this mood so well.

As you can see, there’s a variety of shots from my iPhone, and that’s to be expected. It’s a great camera to have in your pocket. I hope you enjoyed this round-up of some of my favourite iPhone photographs of 2015. I don’t know what 2016 will bring me, but I do know that with my newly acquired 18mm wide angle and 60mm telephoto lens from Moment, I will be sure to have even more fun the next time I go out.

Don’t worry, a review of these Moment lenses will come soon!

2015 Year in Review – Nikon Photography

As 2015 has come to a close, I’m left with the impression that it’s gone by way too quickly. I’ve no doubt taken a lot of photos this past year, with some new favourites created along the way. And, as part of my Toronto Sunrise Series, this past year more than ever I took it upon myself to create even more sunrise photos than in 2014. I hope you’ve enjoyed the photos I’ve posted here on my blog and on my various social media feeds. In this post, I’ll recap some of my favourite photos that I’ve taken in 2015, sunrise or otherwise.

2015 Year in Review: Nikon Photography

Swan spanning its wings during sunrise.

Swan spanning its wings during sunrise.

This swan lake photo was very popular amongst my social media feed, and it earned a lot of reposts throughout various Instagram hubs. At the time I took the photo, I really didn’t think it would be so popular. I remember, however, how I was happy to have caught this moment as it had been one of the items I had on my list of things to capture. Being conscious of keeping the CN Tower in the background, I followed this swan with my 70-200mm lens as it moved along the lake. When the swan decided to spread its wings, I was ready for the shot, keeping it in focus with the CN Tower placed just off to its side.

Peyto Lake Sunset

Peyto Lake Sunset

In 2015, I was fortunate enough to travel to the Canadian Rockies, where I was in awe of Mother Nature and her beauty. Yearning to capture a priceless moment, I was out every sunrise and sunset, even if I had no idea where to go. While most of my sunrise and sunset shoots were clouded over, I still captured what I hope represented the priceless moment in front of me with this one, taken in Peyto Lake.

90-second exposure sunrise with the Lee Big Stopper

90-second exposure sunrise with the Lee Big Stopper

In the latter half of the year—or more precisely, in December—I bought myself the Big Stopper, 10-stop ND filter from Lee Filters. I managed to do a couple test runs with the filter, producing this shot that I thought captured the moment well with the clouds.

Toronto skyline from the Thompson Hotel rooftop lounge.

Toronto skyline from the Thompson Hotel rooftop lounge.

While I may be more partial to landscape photography, I did manage to grab a few pictures of the city that I really liked as well. This one comes from the rooftop of the Thompson Hotel in Toronto, where they hosted an Instagram meetup in the early fall. The sunset brought out some great texture in the clouds, bringing an even more dynamic scene to this already great vantage point.

Nikon D800, 1/6 sec., f/13, ISO100, 70mm

The most striking sunrise shoot of 2015.

This sunrise moment may have been the most striking sunrise shoots I’ve been on in 2015. The moment passed by so quickly that I didn’t have time to even think it would be anything special. I just knew that the combination of low-lying clouds and the colours really made this a stand-out sunrise for me. And by the looks of things, my social media feed definitely agreed with me as well.

Violent sunrise from one of the windiest mornings of 2015.

Violent sunrise from one of the windiest mornings of 2015.

What was one of the windiest sunrises of 2015 yielded some of the best photographs as well. It was a cold October morning with the winds whipping around violently across Lake Ontario. Initially I wasn’t too careful by the shorelines and got my equipment and self wet from the splashes from the rocks. It was that violent. So standing further away from the shoreline, using my 70-200mm, I caught this moment, with some of the most colourful skies in the background.

Bow Lake Sunrise

Bow Lake Sunrise

Bow Lake was a surprise to me as I wasn’t expecting much from it. But even though it was overcast during the sunrise hours, the calm lake and mountains made for a striking image that can’t be forgotten. This bridge acted as a great lead-in for the eye and in turn produced one of my favourite images from my trip to Alberta.

Lake Louise boathouse in the calm, early morning hours.

Lake Louise boathouse in the calm, early morning hours.

This picture of the Lake Louise boathouse turned out much better than I had expected. Wanting to get a unique vantage point from this often-photographed icon of Lake Louise, I opted for a long exposure during the sunrise hours that I was there. Normally seen against the backdrop of the Canadian Rockies, I also opted to crop this image right at the tree line to minimize any distractions. This put all the focus on to the boathouse, yielding in a photo that I absolutely love.

There are many more photos that I took in 2015 that I loved, but I can only choose a handful for this summary. I hope you like these as much as I do, and that you have enjoyed seeing them on my social media feeds. Truth be told, some of these may be new to you as I may not have even posted them online until this post!

Any one of these photos would look great in print, don’t you think? Stay tuned, as that’s my next project for 2016. Let me know in the comments below if you’d be interested in a print of one of my photography.

Coming up in my next post is my 2015 year in review for iPhone photography!

10 Landscape Instagram Accounts That Inspire Me

Have you ever seen these x Instagram followers you need to follow now blog posts? They’re littered all over the Internet so they’re not too hard to find. These lists are great for finding new talent and especially for finding inspiration. While I’ve come across a number of these, I realized that I’ve never actually shared my share of inspiration on my blog. So on this blog post, I thought I’d give some input on which accounts inspire me the most, and which ones I think should deserve a follow.

10 Landscape Instagram Accounts That Inspire Me

Since I’m very partial to landscape and nature photographers, this first list that I’ll be doing will concentrate on this particular genre. Not to worry though, I will come up with a list for other categories in the near future.

10 Landscape Photographers on Instagram That Inspire Me

These accounts on Instagram do a great job of inspiring me to get out and seek adventure. The first list includes accounts that may not be as well known, but still do a great job in making me wish I had built a career out of landscape photography. The second list consists of those that are well known around the social media networks as professional photographers. Here’s my list in no particular order.

Chloe Hibbert: @Clo.Photo

At a relatively young age, it’s great to see people exploring their own backyard. It’s no wonder why Chloe, who lives in Alberta, has a passion for exploring her surroundings. Check her stream for endless adventures in the Canadian Rockies.

Chloe

@Clo.Photo

Shane Black @shanemichaelblack

If Shane’s photos don’t entice you, perhaps his time-lapsing videos will. They’ll take your breath away as you scroll and look through each and every one of these videos, wishing you were there with him.

Shane Michael Black

@shanemichaelblack

Renee Hahnel @reneehahnel and Matthew Hahnel @matthewhahnel

Here’s a duo from Colorado that likes to hike together and take each other’s photographs in places you wish you could be in right now.

@ReneeHahnel

@ReneeHahnel

@MatthewHahnel

@MatthewHahnel

Jovey @vytravels

A Bay-area account that is filled with exploring its surroundings in some of the most beautiful ways.

@vytravels

@vytravels

Masa Onikata @moonlit_japan

If you ever wanted to see Japanese landscapes like you’ve never seen before, this Japanese photographer’s stream is a goldmine. Forgetting the all-too-common Tokyo cityscapes or photos from the streets of Osaka, this stream full of beautiful Japanese landscapes is unique, fresh, and certainly a little moody.

@Moonlit_japan

@Moonlit_japan

Argen Elezi @argenel

He lives in the same city as I do, but we both take very different looking pictures. His style is unique and dreamy, and makes you wish you were right there with him when he took the shot.

@Argenel

@Argenel

Scott Rankin @othellonine

Scott gives a different feel to Vancouver, Canada. The muted tones coming from his account provides a soothing collection of Canada’s beautiful west coast.

@Othellonine

@Othellonine

Karan B. @sendingstache

If Karan’s eye for great composition doesn’t draw you in, his snarky caption he provides for each of his photos will no doubt do the trick.

@Sendingstache

@Sendingstache

Jordan Herschel @jordanherschel

Jordon is a Taho-based travel photographer with beautiful landscapes with subtle colour added throughout his stream.

@JordanHerschel

@JordanHerschel

Katie Goldie @goldiehawn_

Katie’s outdoor adventures will sure whet your appetite for more mountain adventures. As her profile says, she “climbs mountains and stuff.”

Goldie Hawn

@GoldieHawn_

Sam Ciurdar @samciurdar and Amanda Ciurdar @amandaseeyoudarrr

Both Sam and Amanda’s take on their travel photography brings in some more muted tones, but mix in some portraits of one another and you’ll love the refreshing feed filled with happiness.

@SamCiurdar

@SamCiurdar

Amanda Ciurdar

@amandaseeyoudarrr

Additional Accounts for Inspiration

Here’s a list with some more well-known photographers that offer endless adventures and wanderlust on their Instagram feed. I’ve separated them from the list above because these people are likely to already appear on other must follow lists.

Here’s my list of well-known photographers that inspire me, in no particular order.

  1. Colby Brown: @colbybrownphotography
  2. Chris Burkard: @chrisburkard
  3. Paul Zizka: @paulzizkaphoto
  4. Elia Locardi: @elialocardi
  5. Dave Brosha: @davebrosha

Hopefully these accounts will be of some inspiration to you all, and they motivate you to get out and seek the outdoor adventures that your heart yearns for. I know there are a lot more that inspire me, but I have left this initial list at 10 to prevent it from getting too long. If you have suggestions for other landscape accounts on Instagram, feel free to let me know in the comments below.